T-SQL Tuesday #108 – Non SQL Server Technologies

The invitation and summary is from Malathi Mahadevan.

Non SQL Server Technologies

This is also the week of the PASS Summit – the one conference that is still the largest gathering of folks active in the SQL community.  For people like me, who have done the yearly trek to the summit more than a dozen times, it is literally like a family reunion. Aside from these sentiments – what has changed significantly about PASS Summit is that it is no longer a conference entirely dedicated to just SQL Server. There is so much more there – DevOps, Data Science/Machine Learning related, CosmosDB, PowerBI/data visualisation, Entity Framework, Micro Services, on and on. What it indicates is how much data world is expanding and how necessary it is for us to keep up with that. There was a time when I personally wanted to do MCM and retire a SQL Server guru – the MCM went away and right now I know for sure that just insisting on being a SQL Server Guru will not take me very far. I am actively learning how to work with DevOps, PostGres, ElasticSearch, and a number of other things.

So the challenge for this T-SQL Tuesday is – pick one thing you want to learn that is not SQL Server. Write down ways and means to learn it and add it as another skill to your resume. If you are already learning it or know it – explain how you got there and how it has helped you. Your experience may help many others looking for guidance on this.

T-SQL Tuesday #093 – Interviewing Patterns & Anti-Patterns

Invitation and advice from the community from Kendra Little.

What advice do you have for people preparing for or going throughn interview?

Feel free to be creative on this topic. Take whichever approach you like best:

  • You may focus on patterns to follow for success
  • You may list anti-patterns, too: things that might seem like a good idea, but are a recipe for disaster
  • You can write about your own highs and lows as a candidate or as an interviewer
  • Be as specific as you want for interviewing for or hiring for your given skillset, whether you’re a developer, DBA, manager, consultant, or something else entirely

Whichever route you take, it’s probably a good idea to disguise the identities of past employers, candidates, etc.

Personally, I’m going to take the approach of writing about an interview for a SQL Server position that I completely bombed as a candidate, and why it ended up being one of the best learning experiences of my life (although it was painful at the time). It taught me a lot about successful interviewing patterns.

I can’t wait to learn about YOUR interviewing patterns and anti-patterns as well.

Get ready, get set, get blogging!

T-SQL Tuesday #92, Lessons learned the hard way

Current Invitation and roundup from Raul Gonzalez.

For this month, I want you peers to write about those important lessons that you learned the hard way, for instance something you did and put your systems down or maybe something you didn’t do and took your systems down. It can be also a bad decision you or someone else took back in the day and you’re still paying for it…

There are so many things to share here so everybody can learn from each others mistakes, because all of us were once a beginner and no one is born with any knowledge about SQL Server.

Please do not be ashamed of sharing your experiences, you can anonymize the whole story if you want but remember all people make mistakes, the important is to learn from them and try not to repeat them in the future.

T-SQL Tuesday #065 – Teach Something New

Invitation and roundup from Mike Donnelly.

The topic this month is straight forward, but very open ended. You must learn something new and then write a blog post explaining it. One of the reasons I present and blog is because it forces me to really learn a subject if I am going to explain it to someone else. I am now giving all of you that same opportunity.  You’re welcome.

I considered limiting this to just T-SQL, but that seemed….limiting. It just has to be something SQL related and also small enough that you can explain in a single blog post. Maybe a T-SQL command or DMV you have been meaning to learn more about or an SSIS component or PowerShell commandlet you’ve never used before. Try not to make it too theoretical I want some code snippets or screen shots. OK. We’ll meet back here on the internets in a week and all have some new knowledge.

 

T-SQL Tuesday #060 – Something New Learned

Invitation and roundup from Chris Yates.

So, here it is. I put the challenge out to discuss something new learned last week. I was fortunate enough to attend the PASS Summit last week in Seattle. While this post will not be my summarization of that trip (that will be another post) I did have several take-a-ways. I sat in some stellar sessions with some renowned speakers.

However, one re-occurring theme kept coming to my mind – the people. Listen, I’ve been through a lot over my 15 years with SQL, and my 3 years actively involved in the community and this past week affirmed something for me. LISTEN to the people.

I place strong value in the sessions I attended; along with that I have to note that face time; one on one time with real people in my industry is about the best form of learning I could ever hope to obtain.

With that learning comes in issues related to both SQL and non SQL attributes. I had so many positive conversations on leadership alone that sparked a new kind of fire within me; one that was not as bright as what my technical fire had been.

Guys, listen. I could write 10 blog posts on how buffer size could help with backups, the need to have always on implemented, or how to tune indexes all day long. The people, better yet the community is where I believe the learning lies within. Out of 5k people last week I ended up meeting a guy that works two blocks from me and we got to discuss the community and what it means to us.

Have you challenged yourself lately? I mean have you really challenged yourself lately in learning something. I don’t care if you are just starting out or the most seasoned vet around; the ability to learn happens everyday and I’m learning that is what separates the exceptional data professional from the data professional.

You see, the exceptional data professional hangs around the community zone at Pass Summit to help others in the community with issue they may have. The exceptional data professional sits down next to you when you are the new kid on the block and encourages you to make the most of your career then tells you some of his/her pitfalls they had that you can avoid, and the exceptional data professional takes you under his/her wing when you ask them for help or assistance.

You don’t have to travel all the way to Seattle to learn; no you have learning opportunities all around you. From SQL Saturday’s to Virtual Chapters on the web but it starts with you. That’s right, you have to be willing to take that first step; get involved and start learning.

I can tell you from experience and the roller coaster ride I’ve been on for the past three years that you will not regret it. Strive for excellence and provide that leadership through service that the community seeks. Yeah, I may be a tad passionate about what I do; you’ll find that kind of trait with others in the community.

So, I’ve challenged myself……..will you?

T-SQL Tuesday #059 – My Hero

Invitation, no roundup.

It turns out that Tuesday, October 14th, the day your contributions are due, is also Ada Lovelace Day. As you probably know, Ada Lovelace was one of the first female computer programmers (considered by many to be the FIRST computer programmer). If you didn’t know that, here’s your chance to learn some history of our industry. Wendy suggested that we take advantage of this date and do some sort of a tribute to Ada. I agreed, and here we are.

Your Assignment

Ada Lovelace has been an inspiration to many. In keeping with my blog theme, let’s call her a hero. We all have our heroes, those people who we admire, who inspire us, who we strive to be like. Who is your hero?

Your assignment is to acknowledge, in writing, your hero (or heroes). You don’t have to mention them by name if you’re not comfortable doing so, but you do have to tell us how you met them, how they have inspired you, and what qualities or traits of theirs you have striven to adopt.

T-SQL Tuesday #054 – Interviews and Hiring

Invitation and summary from Boris Hristov.

T-SQL Tuesday #042 – The Long and Winding Road

Invitation from Wendy Pastrick. No roundup.

Here’s what I thought it would be fun to share with the community this time around – we all experience change in our work lives. Maybe you have a new job, or a new role at your company. Maybe you’re just getting started and you have a road map to success in mind. Whatever it is, please share it next week, Tuesday May 14th. Make sure you note what technologies you find are key to your interests or successes, and maybe you will inspire someone to look down a road less traveled.

One thing I think would be great to see included in these stories is to hear about how you always thought technology “X” was so awesome, and either it lived up to the hype for you, or maybe it morphed into something else over time. Let’s make these stories about the tech and how that has led you down a certain path.

T-SQL Tuesday #32 – A Day in the Life

Invitation and roundup from Erin Stellato .

When we were kids, sometime during elementary school, adults started asking, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”  The professions initially mentioned varied, but they were often along the lines of teacher, doctor, nurse, fireman, policeman, singer, engineer, etc.  Obviously these are not the only professions in the world.  There are so many different occupations that exist, that whenever I meet someone, I usually ask what they do.  It’s not unusual for someone to list a title I’ve never heard (Improvement Coordinator is one I heard the other day).  But a title doesn’t tell me what that person does.  Even when someone’s a doctor or a teacher, there are so many variations nowadays that I always follow up with, “Well what do you do every day?”  And I ask because I really want to know.  So tell me…

This month’s T-SQL Tuesday post is about you and your job.  Specifically, on Wednesday July 11th or Thursday July 12th, track what you do for an entire day and then write about it.  Hopefully one of those days is a “typical” day and not a vacation day (if it is, then just pick another day or do your best), but ideally, everyone writes about what they did on one specific day. 

The scope of this topic is wide open, you don’t have to simply list what you did – feel free to elaborate on what tasks you love or don’t love, your favorite or least favorite part of the day.  Make the post as non-technical or technical as you want (maybe you learned something new that was really cool).  My only request is that you list your official title, as I plan to include them in some way in my summary post.

T-SQL Tuesday #31 – Logging

Invitation from Aaron Nelson.

I’m excited to be hosting this month’s T-SQL Tuesday.  This month we’re talking about logging.  Logging comes in many form and fashions.  If you think about it, when you go to the grocery store with at big list, Do you put the items in the cart and then check them off the list?  If so, isn’t that a kind of write-ahead log?

I point that out because I don’t want anyone to constrain themselves to talking about logging within just SQL Server.  Please bring your ideas for file transfers, report generating, performance gathering, uptime monitoring and the like.  But don’t stop there!  This is an open invite to anyone that does anything in the SQL Server community.

If Karla Landrum ( blog | twitter ) wants to explain to us how on Earth she keeps track of all these SQL Saturdays around the world, that’s logging!  If Tim Radney ( blog | twitter ) wants to tell us how he makes sure he keeps in touch with all of the chapters he’s responsible for as a PASS Regional Mentor, that’s logging!

How you keep track of blog ideas, white papers you read, or however it is you life-hack *your* SQL world: please share it with us!