T-SQL Tuesday #102 – Giving Back

Invitation and wrap up from Riley Major.

Giving Back

A few months ago Ewald Cress asked you to share stories about people who have made a difference in your professional life. Dozens of you wrote about who impressed you, inspired you, taught you, helped you, and guided you. It’s a testament to the Microsoft data community that so many were recognized by so many– that we have those willing to give of their time and those who are publicly appreciative of it.

Now I will give you an opportunity to give back. Everyone reading this has benefitted from their fellow data professionals. And that benefit puts you in a position to share alike. You’ve learned something, so you can teach. You’ve been supported, so you can help. You’ve been led, so you can lead. But you don’t have to do it alone. We’re all going to do it together.

So here is my call. Pick some way you can help our community. (Ideally, this would be our technical community, but if you’re passionate about some other type of service, that works too.) Then, make a plan– a real plan, with specific steps and dates. Just like Mala Mahadevan asked you to do with your learning goals for this year. Then, and this is the important part, you’re going to write it down for the world to see.

Back when I was still toying with the idea of speaking, it was specific persuasion and public accountability which gave me the push to make it happen. So now I’m giving that to you. I am specifically asking you, dear reader, to make and publish this plan, and I’m going to help make it a reality by gently holding you accountable. You will set your own goals and I will check-in to see how things are going. I will offer what encouragement I can. And I will celebrate your accomplishments.

And if you think there is nothing you can contribute to this community, I am excited to tell you that you are wrong! Some ideas:

Pick something. Tell us why. Tell us how. Tell us when.

We’ll ask “are we there yet?” and give you a high five when we are.

Now to be fair, many #tsql2sday contributors already pour boundless energy into the community. And some might simply not be willing to step up publicly. So for those who still want to party, I submit the alternative topic of your favorite improvement in SQL Server 2017. (If none of the new features excite you, tell us how you successfully used something new from 2016.)

Update 2018-05-02: For those who routinely give back to our community, thank you again for all of your service. I’m not asking you to give any more. A better angle for you on this topic would be to tell us how and why and you started. How did you discover the community’s need? How did you figure out what your role would be in helping? How did you learn the skills you needed to contribute? Where did you find the confidence to take the leap? How would you recommend others proceed? Thanks again and hopefully this provides a better avenue for you to participate this month.

T-SQL Tuesday #101 – My Essential SQL Server Tools

Invitation and roundup from Jens Vestergaard.

The Essential SQL Server Tools in my stack

Besides SQL Server Management Studio and Visual Studio Data Tools we all have our own set of tools that we use for everyday chores and tasks. But how do we get to know which tools are out there, if not for other professionals telling us about them? Does it have to a fully fledged with certification and all? Certainly not! If there’s some github project out there, that is helping you be double as productive, let us know about it. You can even boast about something you’ve built yourself – if you think others will benefit from using it.

Basically I think, that by establishing awareness about what kinds of tools that are out there, new professionals will not have as steep a curve getting the pace up, as they would have had. But I suspect that even some veteran guys could have an “a-ha” moment from reading the summary.

Additionally, you can (read: should) share how you came to depend on said tool – and of course you are encouraged to give credit, where credit is due in terms of making you aware of the tool.

Another approach for this topic, is to approach it as kind of A Day in the Life of kind of blog post, as has been done before by Erin Stellato (b|l|t). Writing with the specific angle to describing how your everyday is made easier by the use of your tool stack.

T-SQL Tuesday #100 – Looking Forward 100 Months

Invitation and roundup from T-SQL Tuesday founder, Adam Machanic.

Let’s look forward…

Anyone who has been in IT for more than 10 minutes knows how the industry works. IT loves its trends, but things tend to be very cyclical. Our current crop of “cloud” technologies are nothing new at the heart of things. The cloud, a wise person once said, is merely someone else’s server. And we’ve seen prior iterations of these same hardware sharing ideas going all the way back to the 1960s. Machine Learning, likewise, has been around in other guises for several years. Columnstore ideas are decades old even if they’re new-ish in the Microsoft space, and even in-memory has a rather deeper history than many realize. None of these “new” technologies about which we’re so excited are actually new, even if they’re newer (and hopefully better) implementations.

It is possible, of course, that a more rapid cycle could break the trend. It is possible that newer technologies will be truly new. Or perhaps the future will simply bring more of the same, a continuation of the everlasting IT sine wave.

Your mission for month #100 is to put on your speculative shades and forecast the bright future ahead. Tell us what the world will be like when T-SQL Tuesday #200 comes to pass. If you’d like to describe your vision and back it up with points, trends, data, or whatever, that’s fine. If you’d like to have a bit more fun and maybe go slightly more science fiction than science, come up with a potential topic for the month and create a technical post that describes an exciting new feature or technology to your audience of June 2026. (Did I do the math properly there?)

T-SQL Tuesday #099 – Dealer’s Choice

Invitation and roundup from Aaron Bertrand.

Aaron is offering a choice.

Behind door #1:

In the spirit of my revelations about still being a hockey card nerd after all these years, and after seeing Drew Furgiuele’s great post on #sqlibirum, I would love to hear about something you are passionate about, outside of the SQL Server or tech community. Bonus points if it’s a passion that might surprise the rest of us. Play the Zeusaphone? Forge Samurai swords? Coach a chess boxer or extreme ironer? Maybe you dabble in toilet seat art? Tell me about it! Show me proof! If you choose door #1, I hope your post is full of pictures or other media, and not just a wall of text. Let’s keep it PG, though, OK?

Behind door #2:

Since many of you might be uncomfortable talking about your non-technical passions, I’ll give you an escape pod back to the more familiar. I have a long laundry list of T-SQL bad habits (there’s a big index here). What’s your favorite one? Which one do you disagree with most vehemently? What bad habits are missing from my list? This is not entrapment; I promise I’m not going to bait you into writing something just so I can argue with you. I’m really interested in reading your opinions and, also, to have more material I can point to when I talk about bad habits and/or best practices.

T-SQL Tuesday #098 – Your Technical Challenges Conquered

The current invitation (January 2017) is for T-SQL Tuesday #98. Invitation and round up from Arun Sirpal.

Please write about and share with the world a time when you faced a technical challenge that you overcame and you can go really technical with both the issue and solution if you like.

From data recovery, tempdb contention, concurrency issues to even DTU exhaustion within Azure SQL Database – there is plenty to potentially write about.

So tell us what the issue was, your troubleshooting mind-set, how knowledge in that specific area guided you and more importantly what you did to overcome this challenging event. Hopefully with this topic we will get to read from both advanced and beginner level bloggers.

You know the saying, When the going gets tough, the tough get going”.

Let’s All Get PoSh – What are you going to automate today for T-SQL Tuesday #094

The current invitation (September 2017) is for T-SQL Tuesday #94. Invitation  and Get-PostRoundup from Rob Sewell.

What are you going to automate today?

PowerShellIt is no surprise to those that know me that I will choose PowerShell as the topic for this month. I am passionate about PowerShell because it has enabled me to have the career I have today and to visit numerous countries all around the world, meet people and talk about PowerShell. By my reckoning searching the TSQL Tuesday website it has been over 3 years since we had a topic specific to PowerShell. So I would like you to blog about PowerShell and SQL Server (or other interesting data platform products)

If you don’t know or use PowerShell GREAT! That’s awesome.

Please spend an hour or so with it and tell us how you got on and what and how you learned. Just like Erik and Brent did. You could install one of the community modules like dbatools, dbareports , SQLDiagAPI  or the Microsoft ones sqlserver or SSRS and try them out and tell us what you learned.

To participate:

  1. Write a post on the topic below
  2. Schedule the post to go live on Tuesday, September 12th (between zero am and midnight, UTC)
  3. Include the TSQL Tuesday logo in the top of your post
  4. Link the post back to this one (it’s easier if you comment on this post and link it)
  5. Optional: Tweet a link to your post using the #tsql2sday hash tag on Twitter

T-SQL Tuesday #92, Lessons learned the hard way

Current Invitation and roundup from Raul Gonzalez.

For this month, I want you peers to write about those important lessons that you learned the hard way, for instance something you did and put your systems down or maybe something you didn’t do and took your systems down. It can be also a bad decision you or someone else took back in the day and you’re still paying for it…

There are so many things to share here so everybody can learn from each others mistakes, because all of us were once a beginner and no one is born with any knowledge about SQL Server.

Please do not be ashamed of sharing your experiences, you can anonymize the whole story if you want but remember all people make mistakes, the important is to learn from them and try not to repeat them in the future.

T-SQL Tuesday #089 – The times they are a-changing

Invitation and roundup from Koen VerBeeck.

This months topic is inspired by the blog post Will the Cloud Eat My DBA Job? by Kendra Little. Technology has changed a lot in the past years, especially with cloud/globalization/automation. What an impact has this had on your job? Do you feel endangered? Or do you have more exciting features/toys to work with? Do you embrace the change and learn new skills? Or do you hide in your cubicle and fear the robot uprising? Let us know how you handle all these changes, or how you feel there are no changes at all for your current job. I’m looking forward to learn how you feel about the future of data management/analysis and how you plan to deal with it.

T-SQL Tuesday #063 – How Do You Manage Security?

Invitation and roundup from Ken Fisher.

I’m your host Kenneth Fisher and this month I’d thought we might talk about security. Security is one of those subjects that most DBAs have to deal with regardless of specialty. So as something we all have to work with at some point or another what are some tips you’d like to share? What’s the best security design? You’ve picked up a legacy system and the security is awful, how do you fix it? Any great tools out there you’d like to share? Hate it or love it I’m betting we all have something to say.

T-SQL Tuesday #062 – HealthySQL

Invitation and Roundup from Robert Pearl.

So, let’s get this blog party started, and kick off our international Healthy SQL campaign. Let’s spread the word to anyone and everyone managing a SQL Server Database infrastructure of the necessity to perform regular health checks on each SQL Server and repeat often.  The purpose here is to get database professionals, to ensure that all their SQL Servers are healthy, and can pass a health check. It also means that you can prove this (to heaven forbid, auditors), and back it up with documentation.

If you want to excel in your career as a data professional or DBA, then you need to be concerned about your companies’ SQLFitness.  Therefore, I am inviting all of you, to blog about your T-SQL Resolution, and describe what it is that you will do this year to make sure your SQL Servers are healthy and fit.  Now, it’s ok to ponder Healthy SQL in the abstract, but we’re looking for some technical tips on things a DBA should do to keep your SQL Servers performing well.

It could be something as simple as implementing a new monitoring software or script, updating all your SQL Servers to the latest version or service pack, setting up maintenance and optimization jobs, HA/DR, creating a performance baseline, capturing performance stats, (ie: DMV automation scripts, or MDW), a checklist ,etc.  Sky is the limit, as long as you can contribute something to the SQLCommunity that can be used in the effort to ensure SQL Fitness.