T-SQL Tuesday #32 – A Day in the Life

Invitation and roundup from Erin Stellato .

When we were kids, sometime during elementary school, adults started asking, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”  The professions initially mentioned varied, but they were often along the lines of teacher, doctor, nurse, fireman, policeman, singer, engineer, etc.  Obviously these are not the only professions in the world.  There are so many different occupations that exist, that whenever I meet someone, I usually ask what they do.  It’s not unusual for someone to list a title I’ve never heard (Improvement Coordinator is one I heard the other day).  But a title doesn’t tell me what that person does.  Even when someone’s a doctor or a teacher, there are so many variations nowadays that I always follow up with, “Well what do you do every day?”  And I ask because I really want to know.  So tell me…

This month’s T-SQL Tuesday post is about you and your job.  Specifically, on Wednesday July 11th or Thursday July 12th, track what you do for an entire day and then write about it.  Hopefully one of those days is a “typical” day and not a vacation day (if it is, then just pick another day or do your best), but ideally, everyone writes about what they did on one specific day. 

The scope of this topic is wide open, you don’t have to simply list what you did – feel free to elaborate on what tasks you love or don’t love, your favorite or least favorite part of the day.  Make the post as non-technical or technical as you want (maybe you learned something new that was really cool).  My only request is that you list your official title, as I plan to include them in some way in my summary post.

T-SQL Tuesday #31 – Logging

Invitation from Aaron Nelson.

I’m excited to be hosting this month’s T-SQL Tuesday.  This month we’re talking about logging.  Logging comes in many form and fashions.  If you think about it, when you go to the grocery store with at big list, Do you put the items in the cart and then check them off the list?  If so, isn’t that a kind of write-ahead log?

I point that out because I don’t want anyone to constrain themselves to talking about logging within just SQL Server.  Please bring your ideas for file transfers, report generating, performance gathering, uptime monitoring and the like.  But don’t stop there!  This is an open invite to anyone that does anything in the SQL Server community.

If Karla Landrum ( blog | twitter ) wants to explain to us how on Earth she keeps track of all these SQL Saturdays around the world, that’s logging!  If Tim Radney ( blog | twitter ) wants to tell us how he makes sure he keeps in touch with all of the chapters he’s responsible for as a PASS Regional Mentor, that’s logging!

How you keep track of blog ideas, white papers you read, or however it is you life-hack *your* SQL world: please share it with us!

T-SQL Tuesday #014 – RESOLUTIONS

Invitation and summary from Sean McCown.

OK, it’s time for TSQLTuesday again and Jen’s making me write something since we’re hosting this month.  So the topic is resolutions, and that in itself isn’t a topic that’s near and dear to me because frankly I just don’t believe in them.  I don’t think you have to wait until a new year begins to resolve to do something you’ve been meaning to do.  In fact, that pretty much dooms you to not completing it because it takes more than the turning of a calendar page and a romantic notion to accomplish something.  If it were really that easy, you would have done it already so it wouldn’t be a big deal.

Your new year can start anytime really.  Hell, doing a new year’s resolution doesn’t even line up with my review period at work, so if I relied on the new year to start something new I’d lose 3mos making good on what I’m supposed to accomplish for work.  People in IT quite often put personal goals in their yearly goals at work.  Things like getting certified, or perfecting a process, or taking management classes, etc are all things that are commonly found in your yearly goals at work.  So if you’re going to make some kind of resolution to do something, or to stop doing something, why not put it where it actually makes more sense… in your work goals.  Your bonus quite often relies on you completing your goals so it’s really the perfect place.  And it gives you a better excuse to have the resolution to begin with because you can use the bonus as motivation.

So even if you’re going to make a resolution at work, try to make it something you can actually do.  One of the biggest reasons for failure is someone will set a goal that’s completely ridiculous for them and when the goal starts slipping they get discouraged and just give up.  I’d like to get my MCM this year, but I don’t even have any of the lower certs yet.  Well, chances are you’re not going to make it dude.